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Book Selection: Your Face Belongs to us

Hello everyone,

Welcome to another book selection here on the blog. This time, after an absence of reading and or listening to books, I’ve already started this one. Its titled Your Face Belongs to Us: A Secretive Startup’s Quest to End Privacy as We Know It and its author and reader is Kashmir Hill.

As a side note, Terry and I are both reading this one, and I’m in chapter 2 and its a 25 chapter 3 part book. Its reading length is 10 hours and was released on the 19th of this month.

My first thoughts are two words. Holy shit. You’ll have to read the prologue to get an understanding on why these two words describe the book to date.

Now, let’s tell you what the book is about, directly from Amazon.


The story of a small AI company that gave facial recognition to law enforcement, billionaires, and businesses, threatening to end privacy as we know it

“The dystopian future portrayed in some science-fiction movies is already upon us. Kashmir Hill’s fascinating book brings home the scary implications of this new reality.”—John Carreyrou, author of Bad Blood

Longlisted for the Financial Times and Schroders Business Book of the Year Award

New York Times tech reporter Kashmir Hill was skeptical when she got a tip about a mysterious app called Clearview AI that claimed it could, with 99 percent accuracy, identify anyone based on just one snapshot of their face. The app could supposedly scan a face and, in just seconds, surface every detail of a person’s online life: their name, social media profiles, friends and family members, home address, and photos that they might not have even known existed. If it was everything it claimed to be, it would be the ultimate surveillance tool, and it would open the door to everything from stalking to totalitarian state control. Could it be true?

In this riveting account, Hill tracks the improbable rise of Clearview AI, helmed by Hoan Ton-That, an Australian computer engineer, and Richard Schwartz, a former Rudy Giuliani advisor, and its astounding collection of billions of faces from the internet. The company was boosted by a cast of controversial characters, including conservative provocateur Charles C. Johnson and billionaire Donald Trump backer Peter Thiel—who all seemed eager to release this society-altering technology on the public. Google and Facebook decided that a tool to identify strangers was too radical to release, but Clearview forged ahead, sharing the app with private investors, pitching it to businesses, and offeringit to thousands of law enforcement agencies around the world.

Facial recognition technology has been quietly growing more powerful for decades. This technology has already been used in wrongful arrests in the United States. Unregulated, it could expand the reach of policing, as it has in China and Russia, to a terrifying, dystopian level.

Your Face Belongs to Us is a gripping true story about the rise of a technological superpower and an urgent warning that, in the absence of vigilance and government regulation, Clearview AI is one of many new technologies that challenge what Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis once called “the right to be let alone.”


You can probably see if the book is elsewhere, but per usual, we’re linking to Amazon which has Kindle, hardcover and audio. Enjoy this one!

We’ll have more soon. See you later!

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Book Review: Fancybear Goes Phishing

Some time back, I finished Fancybear Goes Phishing. I have been meaning to write a review for it for quite awhile and things just continued to come up, but now … here we are.


This book is definitely something worth reading. From convictions to people to learning how they either got convicted or not, you’ll definitely learn something.

Scott, who is not a security expert by trade, really diives in to it with the first ever worm we know about, the Morris Worm.

wikipedia

In the first several chapters, we learn how Robert created this worm, and eventually his conviction. I’m not giving you any details on his conviction except to say that he was f0ound guilty of causing over $1,000 of damage which was under the just created CFAA.

Wikipedia

This book also covers Fancybear themselves as well as other Russian folk under the various names we’ve been talking about for years.

One of the best stories that really sticks out at me is with a gentleman who gets picked up young, promises that he will fly right, but ends up getting the maximum 5 years for the crimes he commited. As we’ve talked about on these podcasts, the crimes for hacking, DDOS and taking personal info that doesn’t belong to you must be higher than the 5-10 years these guys get. The gentleman in question was to get out in July of this year, spending about half of his life already in prison.

The other big non-surprise of this book that we have covered numerous time of, was the biggest phone company problem T-Mobile. How easy it was to get at the data talked about back in 2006 was mindblowing, although as we’ve discussed, they’ve continued to have breaches since. Can anyone say 8 this year to date?

The ending chapter, which is not numbered has to be one of the best bow ties I’ve ever seen in a book as great as this. From someone who had no knowledge of this field, tying the bow was great. The final 13 minute conclusion was good too.

You definitely want to pick up this book, it was a must read.

This book is not available on BARD, but may possibly be found on Bookshare. We link to Amazon here so you get the full book title.


Fancy Bear Goes Phishing: The Dark History of the Information Age, in Five Extraordinary Hacks by Scott J. Shapiro

about the book


“Unsettling, absolutely riveting, and—for better or worse—necessary reading.”

—Brian Christian, author of Algorithms to Live By and The Alignment Problem

An entertaining account of the philosophy and technology of hacking—and why we all need to understand it.

It’s a signal paradox of our times that we live in an information society but do not know how it works. And without understanding how our information is stored, used, and protected, we are vulnerable to having it exploited. In Fancy Bear Goes Phishing, Scott J. Shapiro draws on his popular Yale University class about hacking to expose the secrets of the digital age. With lucidity and wit, he establishes that cybercrime has less to do with defective programming than with the faulty wiring of our psyches and society. And because hacking is a human-interest story, he tells the fascinating tales of perpetrators, including Robert Morris Jr., the graduate student who accidentally crashed the internet in the 1980s, and the Bulgarian “Dark Avenger,” who invented the first mutating computer-virus engine. We also meet a sixteen-year-old from South Boston who took control of Paris Hilton’s cell phone, the Russian intelligence officers who sought to take control of a US election, and others.

In telling their stories, Shapiro exposes the hackers’ tool kits and gives fresh answers to vital questions: Why is the internet so vulnerable? What can we do in response? Combining the philosophical adventure of Gödel, Escher, Bach with dramatic true-crime narrative, the result is a lively and original account of the future of hacking, espionage, and war, and of how to live in an era of cybercrime.

Includes black-and-white images


Have fun reading this one! You’ll thank me later.Its 434 print pages and over 14 hours in audio. This book is a 2023 book.

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A reblog of the recent books recently added to EMHS

Hello folks,

First of all, if you saw the previous post, we’ve tried to fix the list problem but WordPress seems to be stuck in its ways, sorry about that!

To fix this, we made it an ordered list for the sublists to work properly. We don’t know why the double unordered list doesn’t work like it does on the web site, but when this posts again, this should now post properly. It would close the first list item from the author standpoint but keep the rest in tact. Strange tech!

Second, as posted on the 25th, we recently added yet one more book. This gives us 25. And, the newest book will be out in September.

So, now that I think we’re done messing with the books and I’ve fixed all of the HTML for the resources page of EMHS, let’s give you the entire list in which we have new material.

We hope this list is of value.

picture of multiple colored books in clipart form.

The following is the list of books. When looking at the entire list, we show 56 items, notating that we sublist the books from their authors. Some may have multiple books too.

  1. Noah Zhang and Gary Westphalen
  2. Marc Goodman and Robertson Dean
  3. Jeff Horwitz
  4. Christopher Hadnagy
  5. Ben McKenzie and Jacob Silverman
  6. Jeff White
  7. Maxie Reynolds
  8. Nicole Perlroth
  9. Matt Potter
  10. Kevin Poulsen
  11. Joseph Menn
  12. Bruce Sterling
  13. David E. Sanger
  14. Parmy Olson
  15. Michelle Slatalla and Joshua Quittner
  16. Thomas Rid
  17. Bruce Schneier
  18. Bruce Schneier and Ken Maxon
  19. Bobby Hundreds
  20. Ted Koppel
  21. Cris Thomas
  22. Roger A. Grimes
  23. Kashmir Hill

If you’ve got any questions, please drop us a line. Thanks for reading!

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Book: Your face belongs to us

Late last night, I was going through messages. Your Face Belongs to Us: A Secretive Startup’s Quest to End Privacy as We Know It will be released in late September.

The book is by NY Times coorespondent Kashmir Hill.

We’re adding it to the list, so this will make 25 books.

We’ll be back later on when we have more. Let me know what you think!

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The Books just got a major update: 24 new books to the mix

Hello folks,

On our Resources page of EMHS, we have 24 new books and a number of new authors.

If you have been browsing the list within the last few hours, you may have seen it broken and full of bugs. I’ve now finally fixed it.

But for those who have not been there, I’m going to only present our newest offerings within this post.

Nick has a brand new list in his folder that is not numbered and he will be able to find it and work on it when he gets around to it.

If anyone wants the newest list to see what they think and what not, I can send the file to you upon request.

Now, here is the list of what we’ve just added to the list as of today. Remember that we link to Amazon properties as a convenience, but you can search out your favorite place and see if they have it.


picture of multiple colored books in clipart form.

  1. Noah Zhang and Gary Westphalen
  2. Marc Goodman and Robertson Dean
  3. Jeff Horwitz
  4. Christopher Hadnagy
  5. Ben McKenzie and Jacob Silverman
  6. Jeff White
  7. Maxie Reynolds
  8. Nicole Perlroth
  9. Matt Potter
  10. Kevin Poulsen
  11. Joseph Menn

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Book Selection: Fancybear Goes Phishing

Hello folks,

After some time away from reading, I’ve made my mind up on what I’m going to be reading next.

The book was found through a podcast called Cybercrime Radio and it sounds like a great read based on what I’ve heard.

Below, please find the information about the book, so you’re informed on what its about.

You’ll also get a link to the book through Amazon if you wish to purchase it or listen to it through Audible.

Fancybear Goes Phishing

The full title of the book is: Fancy Bear Goes Phishing: The Dark History of the Information Age, in Five Extraordinary Hacks and the author is Scott J. Shapiro.

About the book

“Unsettling, absolutely riveting, and—for better or worse—necessary reading.” —Brian Christian, author of Algorithms to Live By and The Alignment Problem

An entertaining account of the philosophy and technology of hacking—and why we all need to understand it.

It’s a signal paradox of our times that we live in an information society but do not know how it works. And without understanding how our information is stored, used, and protected, we are vulnerable to having it exploited. In Fancy Bear Goes Phishing, Scott J. Shapiro draws on his popular Yale University class about hacking to expose the secrets of the digital age. With lucidity and wit, he establishes that cybercrime has less to do with defective programming than with the faulty wiring of our psyches and society. And because hacking is a human-interest story, he tells the fascinating tales of perpetrators, including Robert Morris Jr., the graduate student who accidentally crashed the internet in the 1980s, and the Bulgarian “Dark Avenger,” who invented the first mutating computer-virus engine. We also meet a sixteen-year-old from South Boston who took control of Paris Hilton’s cell phone, the Russian intelligence officers who sought to take control of a US election, and others.

In telling their stories, Shapiro exposes the hackers’ tool kits and gives fresh answers to vital questions: Why is the internet so vulnerable? What can we do in response? Combining the philosophical adventure of Gödel, Escher, Bach with dramatic true-crime narrative, the result is a lively and original account of the future of hacking, espionage, and war, and of how to live in an era of cybercrime.

Includes black-and-white images

Here is a link to the Kindle edition of the book and of course, you can choose from hardcover, the kindle, or audible.

Happy reading!

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Book Review: Tracers in the dark, by Andy Greenberg

Welcome to my review of Tracers in the Dark by Andy Greenberg. I’m not going to talk about every part of the book, but I will mention some of what I thought was interesting. I’m not going to cover every single thing, but I will highlight what I thought was interesting.

The first part

Besides the first case of the Dread Pirate Roberts in the Silk Road case of many years back, the book talked at great length about a startup company called Chainalysis. It talked about how it was started and its help in catching the Dread red handed at a library. That part is 14 chapters roughly.

While Chainalysis has a hand in the majority of the book, how it grew in to this huge company where they developed software on the public blockchain of the Bitcoin crypto currency platforms is quite interesting.

It also talked about a paper by a woman named Sarah who thought that Crypto could be used for good, but as you find out, she likes what Chainalysis has done through the cases of this book.

Part 2

Besides the Silk Road, part 2 also talked about the demise of one of the first exchanges of Crypto Currency and bitcoin specificly. I forget the name of the exchange, but as you’ll read later, other exchanges have had their fate too, like FTX as an example.

Part 3

Part 3 covers Alphabay, one of the most covered stories of its day. It was another one of these drug bizars for its time. Unfortunately, one of the sad things you’ll find is that the perpitrator committed suicide, although the book talks about the feds killing him. Yu can make the decision on whether they did or didn’t.

Part 4

Part 4 I had to put down after the first chapter. The rest of the section talks about how they found the server of the video site in someone’s apartment, another suicide, but most importantly a different discovery found. I won’t give that away either.Suffice it to say, its a tictic that can be used in modern browsers to look at source code.

The chapter covers something known as CSAM, otherwise known as Child Pornogrophy.

Part 5

Part 5 was a hodgepodge of cases including the recent ones which include the January 6th case where Crypto was involved in. Its sort of a loose ends of interviews for the book that just made it in.

The book is 50 chapters and an epilogue covering 10 hours of reading on Audible. The Narrator actually did a great job. The book itself is not technical and the things discussed are explained. The chapters aren’t necessarily lengthy either.

About the book

Tracers in the Dark: The Global Hunt for the Crime Lords of Cryptocurrency

From the award-winning author of Sandworm comes the propulsive story of a new breed of investigators who have cracked the Bitcoin blockchain, exposing once-anonymous realms of money, drugs, and violence. “I love the book… It reads like a thriller… These stories are amazing.” (Michael Lewis)

Over the last decade, a single innovation has massively fueled digital black markets: cryptocurrency. Crime lords inhabiting lawless corners of the internet have operated more freely—whether in drug dealing, money laundering, or human trafficking—than their analog counterparts could have ever dreamed of. By transacting not in dollars or pounds but in currencies with anonymous ledgers, overseen by no government, beholden to no bankers, these black marketeers have sought to rob law enforcement of their chief method of cracking down on illicit finance: following the money.

But what if the centerpiece of this dark economy held a secret, fatal flaw? What if their currency wasn’t so cryptic after all? An investigator using the right mixture of technical wizardry, financial forensics, and old-fashioned persistence could uncover an entire world of wrongdoing.

Tracers in the Dark is a story of crime and pursuit unlike any other. With unprecedented access to the major players in federal law enforcement and private industry, veteran cybersecurity reporter Andy Greenberg tells an astonishing saga of criminal empires built and destroyed. He introduces an IRS agent with a defiant streak, a Bitcoin-tracing Danish entrepreneur, and a colorful ensemble of hardboiled agents and prosecutors as they delve deep into the crypto-underworld.

The result is a thrilling, globe-spanning story of dirty cops, drug bazaars, trafficking rings, and the biggest takedown of an online narcotics market in the history of the Internet.

Utterly of our time, Tracers in the Dark is a cat-and-mouse story and a tale of a technological one-upmanship. Filled with canny maneuvering and shocking twists, it answers a provocative question: How would some of the world’s most brazen criminals behave if they were sure they could never get caught?

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The book list has a major upgrade, 9 more books added, more on the way

picture of multiple colored books in clipart form.

Hello everyone! We have added another 9 books to our collection and the links are now up on emailhostsecurity.com under our resources page.

As we tend to do, although we haven’t done weekly updates because of not finding a lot of articles lately, the what’s changed posts have been stagnant.

Below, please find our list of new books for our collection. We also had a club room recently open where Terry and I were going through books to determine if anything else should be added. It was open to the club, so go on clubhouse as you never know what we’re working on next.

Our sidekick, Nick, will be getting the new list within the week and he can take his time with it as we’ve got a lot more.

The site also got some paragraph restructuring on our resources page too as well as a disclaimer of strong language.

Here are the books, and thanks for reading!

The book list

  • Ian Leaf and Ian Andrews
  • John Gower III
  • Scott J. Shapiro
  • Laurent Richard, Sandrine Rigaud and Rachel Maddow
  • Glenn Greenwald
  • Geoff White
  • Brian Krebs
  • Nick Bilton
  • Jamie Bartlett
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    Here are the latest books we’ve posted to EMHS

    Picture of multi colored books

    Folks,

    We’re behind on this EMHS site of ours. Here is the link to Email Host Security.

    On it, you’ll learn why I baught the domain after it was used for phishing, resources to terms blogs and articles about the Phishing landscape and scams as well as books talking about the subject.

    Some of the books listed may be older but valuable anyhow. We do not list the books in any type of order, but we did talk about books we’ve added recently.

    Below, please find the links to Amazon to the books we’ve recently added.

    Remember, these books may be available elsewhere but we can’t link to those because they are services specificly for the disabled. We have all kinds of readers here, so we want to link to a source everyone can access. Thanks so much for reading!

    I’ll be getting more books for review and edition at some point.

    • Kevin Mitnick, Steve Wozniak and William L. Simon
  • Kevin Mitnick and Mikko Hypponnen
  • Dave Eggers
  • Frank Abagnale
  • Marsha Bertrand
  • Daniel J. Solove
  • Paul Larosa and Maria Cramer
  • Phil Lapsley
  • Ron Smith
  • Mitchell Zuckoff
  • Matthew Danda
  • Leigh Baker
  • John E Douglas and Stephen Singular
  • Comments (0)

    TikTok says: “We’re embedded” in to the operating system

    I was listening to the latest minute by Kim Komando, the digital goddess that has been around just as long as some of us older folk in the field of technology.

    In the daily minute for today, she indicates that the CEO of TikTok indicated somewhere that even if TikTok was banned in America, they’re embedded so deep in to the operating system, that removing the app won’t delete the tracking that they have in place.

    I guess it’d mean that every single phone or device that had TikTok on it would have to be factory reset?

    I never had TikTok on the phone and I will not have it on the phone.

    It seems to me that we might be screwed, and not in a way that I’d like.

    What do we tell users who are tired of this spying that the government is doing, especially China? I’m not sure what the answer is, if this is true.

    There is no linked article, so I’ll leave with this as a thought article piece of my own.

    Make it a great day.

    Comments (0)

    Book Review: If It’s Smart, It’s Vulnerable 1st Edition by Mikko Hypponen

    Hello everyone.

    Today, I’m going to talk about a book I finished some time back and read through Kindle. Its called If It’s Smart, Its Vulnerable.

    The author is one who I’ve known of for some time. This blog post from September 2022 talks about where I heard of the book and the interview of a podcast I stumbled upon. I then blogged about the audio book being available later in the month.

    The book starts the reader at a time where the Internet was brand new. Mikko starts the reader out describing the history of the Internet, how it became, how he started working in the field and more.

    As the book progresses, he talks about how he found the people who were behind one of the first viruses to spread, through floppy disks.

    As the book progresses, he starts talking about the ransomware problems, the attacks that Russia started against Ukraine and other nations and the different types of worms, trojans and viruses that accompanied us through the years and how they spread.

    The book is a 2022 book and it does a great job in defing terms when applicable. Its not meant to be a technical write up of any particular issue, but more of a chronological timeline of work and development of a company which is still around today.

    If you really want an overview of how the Internet started and the various issues that had to be delbt with in regards to the landscape, this might be one for you.

    About the Book

    “ Reimagine the future of the internet

    All our devices and gadgets—from our refrigerators to our home security systems, vacuum cleaners, and stereos—are going online, just like our computers did. But once we’ve successfully connected our devices to the internet, do we have any hope of keeping them, and ourselves, safe from the dangers that lurk beneath the digital waters?

    In If It’s Smart, It’s Vulnerable, veteran cybersecurity professional Mikko Hypponen delivers an eye-opening exploration of the best—and worst—things the internet has given us. From instant connectivity between any two points on the globe to organized ransomware gangs, the net truly has been a mixed blessing.

    In this book, the author explores the transformative potential of the future of the internet, as well as those things that threaten its continued existence:
    government surveillance, censorship, organized crime, and more.

    Readers will also find: ”

    • Insightful discussions of how law enforcement and intelligence agencies operate on the internet
    • Fulsome treatments of how money became data and the impact of the widespread use of mobile supercomputing technology
    • Explorations of how the internet has changed the world, for better and for worse
    • Engaging stories from Mikko’s 30-year career in infosec

    “Perfect for anyone seeking a thought-provoking presentation of some of the most pressing issues in cybersecurity and technology, If It’s Smart, It’s Vulnerable will also earn a place in the libraries of anyone interested in the future of the internet. ”

    Conclusion

    For Mikko’s first book, this was quite enlightening. Some of the things I could relate too, while others like the chapter on the Internet starting in the late 60s to 70s was quite interesting. Like I said, this book isn’t necessarily technical and things are explained.

    Here is a link to If It’s Smart, It’s Vulnerable 1st Edition. Other formats may be available and can be chosen through the link.

    The book is also available on Bookshare.

    I hope that this is of value to you, thanks for reading!

    Comments (0)

    Book Selection: Tracers in the dark

    Tracers In The Dark by Andy Greenberg is my next read. I’ve gotten the audible book, but I’ve not started it yet.

    This is Andy’s third book. It is a 2022 read. We finished Sandworm which is a 2019 book recently, and we have This Machine Kills Secrets by him which is his 2018 book.

    About the Book

    From the award-winning author of Sandworm comes the propulsive story of a new breed of investigators who have cracked the Bitcoin blockchain, exposing once-anonymous realms of money, drugs, and violence.

    “A gripping, stranger-than-fiction tale of how a small team of geeks and federal agents cracked what was once thought to be untraceable cryptocurrency.”
    —Garrett M. Graff, New York Times bestselling author of The Only Plane in the Sky and Watergate

    Over the last decade, a single innovation has massively fueled digital black markets: cryptocurrency. Crime lords inhabiting lawless corners of the internet have operated more freely—whether in drug dealing, money laundering, or human trafficking—than their analog counterparts could have ever dreamed of. By transacting not in dollars or pounds but in currencies with anonymous ledgers, overseen by no government, beholden to no bankers, these black marketeers have sought to rob law enforcement of their chief method of cracking down on illicit finance: following the money.

    But what if the centerpiece of this dark economy held a secret, fatal flaw? What if their currency wasn’t so cryptic after all? An investigator using the right mixture of technical wizardry, financial forensics, and old-fashioned persistence could uncover an entire world of wrongdoing. Tracers in the Dark is a story of crime and pursuit unlike any other. With unprecedented access to the major players in federal law enforcement and private industry, veteran cybersecurity reporter Andy Greenberg tells an astonishing saga of criminal empires built and destroyed. He introduces an IRS agent with a defiant streak, a Bitcoin-tracing Danish entrepreneur, and a colorful ensemble of hardboiled agents and prosecutors as they delve deep into the crypto-underworld.

    The result is a thrilling, globe-spanning story of dirty cops, drug bazaars, trafficking rings, and the biggest takedown of an online narcotics market in the history of the Internet. Utterly of our time, Tracers in the Dark is a cat-and-mouse story and a tale of a technological one-upmanship. Filled with canny maneuvering and shocking twists, it answers a provocative question: How would some of the world’s most brazen criminals behave if they were sure they could never get caught?

    Book title: Tracers in the Dark: The Global Hunt for the Crime Lords of Cryptocurrency
    Author: Andy Greenberg
    link: Link goes to Kindle but you can get any of the methods by selecting its button

    If this book is as good as Sandworm, I hope to report on it real good. From what I heard in the sample through audible, it sounds like its going to be a lot of fun.

    I hope you’ll join me in the reading department! Thanks for reading, make it a great day!

    Comments (0)

    Book review: Sandworm

    Hello everyone,

    On February 2, 2023, I posted to this blog my next read, Sandworm. I recently finished it, and boy was it good.

    The book is 42 chapters and an epilogue. You can check out the resources and even the bibliogrophy if you wish.

    The book defines several different terms like zero-day, rootkit and others.

    The main portion of the book talks about the Russia/Ukraine conflict and what Russia supposedly has done to Ukraine. This was interesting, as some of the things talked about like Mimikatz, Olympic Destroyer and others were big topics on programs like Security Now.

    It talked about the multiple blackouts that Ukraine had in power and other Internet troubles through the years. This was especially interesting because some of the current war they’re dealing with had some of the same things. The difference between now and then was the devistation and rippling effect of the Internet attacks back then.

    While Ukraine has had more problems in this war they’re fighting now, it seems as though it wasn’t so bad as it could’ve been, unless Russia is still developing something we don’t know about yet.

    Andy Greenberg’s writing and explanations of what took place was quite fascinating. We learn that Sandworm was actually developed in 2009, and in conjunction with Mimikatz and other tools, became a powerhouse of an attack vector that could in theory could be used anywhere.

    The book itself is roughly 345 pages, and I did skip the references but did read the bibliogrophy. Some of the books mentioned I’ve read including Countdown to Zero Day: Stuxnet and the Launch of the World’s First Digital Weapon.

    I’m wondering who will pick up this story as the publication of this book was in 2019. I recently spotted an article about Sandworm through Cyberscoop I believe and they’re still out there.

    If you’re new to cybersecurity, this might be the book you want to start with. It isn’t too technical and I believe it describes what’s going on quite well.

    You can find Sandworm through a link I’ll provide on the blog, or through Bookshare if you have an account with them. Its also available through Apple Books if you wish to use that service as well. It wouldn’t surprise me if it was available at the library and you can borrow it through there.

    The price of the print digital copy is $14.95 with the audio version $16.95 through Kindle or other services.

    I honestly hope that you’ll check this book out, it does explain a lot of what’s going on with the cyber warfare we’re hearing about either in the tech press or even in your local news.

    Let me know what you think, did you read the book? What did you think of it? Let’s discuss the book right here!

    Book

    Other Books

    Andy has several other books out. One was a 2018 write up, the other is a 2022 write up. Those are:

    Final Thoughts

    I hope you will check out these books. They’re definitely an educational read and can start you on the path of learning more about the ways they fight these things mentioned in this or any of the other books and you’ll start to understand why it is a big deal when something happens that we may not much care about.

    Thanks for reading, have fun!

    Comments (0)

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