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Braille Institute says that January is technology month from blog The Technology blog and podcast

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Braille Institute says that January is technology month

I read at least one of these books in the following list, have anyone of you read any? The book I read and podcasted about when the books was around is called The Circle and it was a great book. Let’s see what everyone else has read.


I was going through Email, and found an email talking about January being technology month.

Below, the following books are generalized to fiction and non-fiction and are already available on BARD. Check your cooperating library outside the United States to see if these books are available to you.


Non-Fiction

 
Steve Jobs by Walter Isaacson – DB73682 (Spanish version: DB 72993)
Biography of entrepreneur Steve Jobs (1955-2011) chronicles his childhood, education, entry-level jobs in California’s Silicon Valley, 1976 cofounding
of Apple computer in his parents’ garage, and leadership in spearheading the iPod, iPhone, and iPad. Discusses Jobs’ personal and professional relationships
and his 2003 cancer diagnosis.  

Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World by Cal Newport – DB94076
Computer scientist presents an argument for reducing the amount of time we spend online. Uses case studies to form a foundation for why to do this and
suggests ways to undertake a “digital declutter.” 

Bad Blood by John Carreyou – DB 91456
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist recounts his investigation into Silicon Valley startup company Theranos, which claimed its new machine would speed up
and simplify blood testing. Describes interviews with insiders, research into the technology, threats he received as he uncovered fraud after fraud, and
Theranos’s eventual collapse. 

Invisible Women: Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado-Perez – DB94381
Examination of a root cause of gender inequality–the exclusion of women or preferential bias toward men in research data sets. Discusses the ways these
biases play out in daily life, the workplace, product design, the doctor’s office, and public life, and what happens when things go wrong. 

The Patient Will See You Now: The Future of Medicine is in Your Hands by Eric Topol DBC02757 
A trip to the doctor is almost a guarantee of misery. Eric Topol, one of the nation’s top physicians says it doesn’t have to be that way. You could use
your smartphone to get rapid test results from one drop of blood, monitor your vital signs both day and night, and use an artificially intelligent algorithm
to receive a diagnosis without having to see a doctor.

Megatech: Technology in 2050 by Daniel Franklin DB88590 
A collection of essays forecasting the role of technology in the year 2050. Contributors include journalists, scientists, entrepreneurs, philanthropists,
medical doctors, philosophers, and novelists. In her essay, Melinda Gates envisions what might happen if every woman in the world had a smartphone of her
own. 

The Smartphone Society: Technology, Power, and Resistance in the New Gilded Age by Nicole Marie Aschoff DB98753
Journalist examines the rise of smartphone usage and ways corporations including Google, Facebook, and Amazon have used smartphones to surveil social,
political, and economic activity of users. Discusses the ways users have taken advantage of the technology to create and maintain political resistance
movements. 

Beauty and the Beak: How Science, Technology, and a 3D-Printed Beak Rescued a Bald Eagle by Deborah Lee Rose & Jane Veltkamp DB89590
After a hunter shattered her beak, Beauty, a bald eagle, was rescued in Alaska and relocated to Birds of Prey Northwest, a raptor center in Idaho. Recounts
how scientists and engineers created a prosthetic beak from a 3D printer while her real beak regenerated slowly.

Blood, Sweat, and Pixels: The Triumphant, Turbulent Stories Behind How Video Games Are Made by Jason Schreier DB90959
A journalist who covers the video game industry documents the process of making a game, from initial concept with the game creator through the large team
efforts that it takes to develop a popular game. Includes creation stories of popular games like Diablo III, Halo Wars, and more. 

Cryptography: The Key to Digital Security, How it Works, and Why it Matters by Keith M. Martin  DB101019
Information security specialist presents an explanation of the role of cryptography–often associated with the world of spies–in the world of information
security. Topics covered include what security means in cyberspace, algorithms and what they do, cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin, and potential scenarios
for the use of cryptography. 
 

Fiction

 
Ready Player One by Ernest Cline DB73772
2045. Multibillionaire James Halliday dies, leaving his last will and testament online for the world to see. His massively multiplayer online game OASIS
has a hidden feature–an Easter egg–and the person who finds the egg first wins Halliday’s fortune. 

The Circle: A Novel by Dave Eggers DB77770
Mae begins work at the Circle–a company that reinvented the Internet by creating one transparent identity for each user. Although enthralled by her increasingly
powerful online role, Mae is troubled to learn that the company may have a dark side. 

Jurassic Park: A Novel by Michael Crichton DB32018
Something is terribly wrong at Jurassic Park on a remote island off the coast of Costa Rica. Visitors and residents are being attacked by strange looking
animals that maul them and leave behind a sticky saliva. Dinosaurs cloned and raised by a genetic engineering firm have escaped. Consultants are brought
in to solve the problem, but soon everyone is running for dear life. 

I, Robot by Isaac Asimov DB15779
U. S. Robots and Mechanical Men, Inc, headed by the strong-minded Susan Calvin, manufactures and sells intelligent, human-like robots. Nine stories illustrate
how the robots are programed with the three Laws of Robotics to serve man, despite many of the ingrained fears and prejudices humans have against them.

Feed by M.T. Anderson DB55687
In the future, most people have computer implants in their heads streaming information. Titus has had his since birth, while home-schooled Violet received
hers later. When the “feed” is attacked by a hacker, Titus’s system shortly recovers but Violet’s continues to malfunction. 


Informazioni sull'articolo

Braille Institute says that January is technology month was released on January 11, 2021 at 8:00 pm by tech in general-updates-and-announcements.
Last modified: January 11, 2021.


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