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Do you think the Internet is for everyone? Graphic, graphic, unlabeled buttons, and more still rule the Internet today from blog The Technology blog and podcast

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Do you think the Internet is for everyone? Graphic, graphic, unlabeled buttons, and more still rule the Internet today

I started on the Internet way back in the early 90s before graphics became a thing for the Internet. I’m sure that there could have been small little icons made for Dos that could’ve appeared, but it wasn’t a big deal. Links were numbered, and it was easy to navigate.

Fast forward to the windows age, and graphics started. Using a screen reader myself as I do every day, I admire an article like this. We covered the Dominos case and I know the person named in the article that filed that suit.

In this wired piece entitled The Internet Is for Everyone, Right? Not With a Screen Reader is a great article. The subheading says:

Blind users have been fighting for a more inclusive web for over 20 years. Are lawsuits like the one against Domino’s going to make a difference?

I’m unsure at this time if this suit will have implications on whether the Internet will change. This goes on way beyond ordering a pizza.

This article talks about someone finding out that clothing stores are closed, and that everything is going to go online. That is all well and good if the images are labeled correctly so we know what they are and can make an informed decision on what we’re buying.

When I last baught a fanny pack, I asked my person who comes to assist me to look at the various options where he can see the pictures. I told him which ones based on description I didn’t want, and we picked one and I made the purchase through amazon. While Amazon is usually pretty good with their buttons to buy and the like, there are still sites tha don’t do this.

When I learned how to code, I learned how I can make my images have alt text or alternitive text. Take the following code taken from MENVI’s web site.

I have the image tag, the path to the file, and alternitive text in a piece of code. It’s described below.

The first tag is the center tag to tell the browser that I want to center the logo on to the page. Then the image tag and the pointer to the file. After that, I have “alt equals” and in quotation marks a small description of the image. This is a sample, and it can be used as a sample for you to describe your images.

If you want to see the code, contact me, as I tried to get it in place but it didn’t show the code based on how I understand how to do this. I’ll be happy to share it!

Buttons are harder, I use a standard button with the input type for submitting and resetting the form. I have sample code to make images clickable links, if I were to do that, but I’d rather be simple.

One of the things I had trouble with was my edit boxes weren’t working right. I would tab around and nothing would read. I was sent information about titles within edit boxes, and now I use them within the forms of my site.

As you can see, I have even taken the steps as a blind web master to make sure I learn how this is done as I don’t want to have a site I can’t even use. It doesn’t benefit me or my visitors, especially through MENVI. MENVI has blind and sighted people, and I need to make it accessible for all.

Have you read this wired article and what have you thought of it? Have any other ideas if you’ve looked at my site(s) that I can learn? I’d love to hear from you, so do contact me, register and comment, and make that voice be heard. We’re all in this together, let the learning begin!Read the article, because it’ll be an eye opener on how the technology works. Don’t be afraid to close your eyes and picture what is written.


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Do you think the Internet is for everyone? Graphic, graphic, unlabeled buttons, and more still rule the Internet today was released on November 10, 2020 at 4:00 pm by tech in accessibility newsand issues,article commentary.
Last modified: November 9, 2020.


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